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1 2 sons Family: F96
 
2 4 Daughters Family: F107
 
3 Patrick Graeme of Inchbrackie and Aberuthven
 
Family: F47
 
4 Nina married John Laws, a surveyor, and had 7 children: Daphne, Helen, Peter, William, Joan, Ann and Felicity. They remained in Tanganyika, also farming, for many years before returning to the UK. Nina died in August, 2014. Giovanna Maria de Luigi
 
5 After the war Marghie was married to Kenyon and they were allocated farm land at West Kilimanjaro. Ken had been in the KAR, but had been invalided out with a burst appendix. For the rest of the war he went on to run farms with Italian prisoners of war. The prisoners were happy to work rather than go back into the war or back to Italy. Some never left. Ken and Marghie had 3 children, Robin, Phyllis and me, Sally. Mum died in June 2013. Margherita Francesca de Luigi
 
6 DKM: On Sept. 19, 1616, when Margaret [ARCHDALE] Combe died, her sons were estimated ages: Archdale age 9; William age 11; John age 14; Mary age 26; Margaret age 28 (who may have been Margaret d. 1594). Barbara ARCHDALE, their maternal aunt, had m William PALMER (See also 1629 and May 1634 records below). Barbara Archdale
 
7 Vicar of Chipstable 1908-1913 John Montgomery Baldwin
 
8 Priest 1853
Darjeeling 1857-1878 
John Richard Baldwin
 
9 Peter Bird was an ocean rower who died during an attempt to row the Pacific east to west. Peter Bird
 
10 Elizabeth Bisset, was one of the co-heirs of Sir John Bisset of the Aird (of Lovat), from whom Hugh obtained Kilravock Elizabeth Bisset, of Kilravock
 
11 Schoolmaster and author, Reginald Bosworth Smith was born on June 28, 1839, at The Rectory, West Stafford, in Dorset, one of twelve children of Reginald Southwell Smith and Emily Genevieve Simpson who were married in 1836.
His books include

Mohammed and Mohammedanism
Life of Lord Lawrence
Bird Life and Bird Lore
Rome and Carthage: The Punic Wars
Carthage and the Carthaginians 
Reginald Bosworth Smith
 
12

A LITTLE HISTORY- EVELYN MARY BRANCKER
This information may not be totally correct but I am happy to be stood corrected

Acknowledgements
Felicity Laws ? researcher and fount of knowledge on our family tree
I got a certain amount from a long time friend of EMB, Joan Baldock, which started the trail in 1994
--------------------------------------------------------------------------
EMB known to her ?youth friends? as ?Birdie? and to her grandchildren and everybody else as ?Bama?
She was born on 16-1-1887. She was educated at Cheltenham Ladies College.
Ted Wickham (TW) returned from Brazil on 24-1-1914, landing at Fishguard from the S.S. Hildebrand, whose passenger list showed his occupation as ?planter?
Evelyn Mary Brancker married Ted Wickham in April 1914 in Axbridge Somerset.
Both of their fathers were Vicars in Somerset. Events in their lives must be seen against this background about 100 years ago.
Our family had absolutely no knowledge of EMB?s first marriage to Ted Wickham. Joan Baldock was the only person that she confided in, hence a little knowledge after her death.
The following I gathered from some news paper cuttings of articles that she had written for the Sunday News in 1955. Probably a Kenya paper?
EMB/W and her new husband Ted went to Tanganyika, now Tanzania, in May/ June 1914, when it was German Territory.
She told Joan B. that Governor Schnee in Dar es Salaam, had warned them to go to Zanzibar or be interned, because war was coming.
Ted had a job on a coffee/sisal farm outside Dar-es-Salaam at a place called Soga. Life there was better health wise and away from the politics in Dar. They were not well received by the Germans at Soga being English. They had good neighbours, a Polish Count and Countess who managed to salvage a few of their worldly goods when they were interned. I don?t know how long they were there before they were interned at Tabora for the first time.




WW1 started on 4-8-1914.
By this time her marriage was not going too well as told to JB. No doubt internment put extra pressure on a troubled marriage.
Life in internment camps was tough. They seemed to have been put in trains moved a bit, dumped at a station and made to walk to the next place. This was all along the central railway line from Dar to Tabora. It was extremely hot and they had either bad food or little food. Water was not always healthy. At a place called Bugiri they had to sieve the water through cloth a few times to get rid of the worst of the ?wrigglers?.
Luckily they weren?t in Bugiri for long when shooting started, so they were told to ?be ready to move in half an hour?. They had had no food and were marched up a dry river bed in the dark with injuries to legs and ankles, ?like miserable sheep? to the next station called Kikombo.
They were mainly locked up in railway ?go-downs? which were warehouses frequently made of corrugated metal. One can only imagine the heat in those ?ovens?.
At Kikombo they were locked up for 36 hours in an overcrowded ?go-down? that was very hot, then loaded up on to a train ?like cattle going to slaughter?. She does not remember the journey too well as they were semi-conscious from heat exhaustion and taken back to Tabora for the 2nd time.
Whilst in prison at Tabora (I think) she gave birth to a little girl called Mehala (Mehala Mary W Wickham) on 3-6-1916. Life for new mothers and babies was hard as the Germans made little effort to clothe, feed or help.
Tabora was a huge camp with lots of other nationalities including Polish and a lot of Africans. In Tabora town there were Italian prisoners on parole. They proved very kind and good at bartering odd possessions for sugar and cigarettes and passing them through windows to the prisoners. The internees also discovered via the Italians that the Germans had been stealing all their Red Cross parcels and eating the food. She also met up with some old friends, no names but, thankfully at this point they were no longer under the care of a rather nasty German called Dorendorf

In the early hours of 14th September 1916 a rather hysterical scared person rushed into her room which was near the gate, shouted at her to take the keys and release the prisoners. During the night there had been quite a lot of shooting going on but the prisoners didn?t know what was going on. EMB took the keys and went back to bed until 6am as it was pointless opening the doors at 4am.





It turned out to be the British and Belgian (Congo) lot and they had no idea that there were any prisoners there. The Germans had disappeared into the night but were gradually rounded up and put under lock and key where the prisoners had been liberated from. Freedom at last.
EMB/W had a poisoned foot and a young baby so she was given a lift to Mwanza on Lake Victoria. The others had to walk. From there it was a fairly short time and she was in Nairobi and met up with the others.
After all that things suddenly are a lot vaguer ? no more newspaper cuttings
I think she was in Kenya for a while but have no idea for how long.
She and Ted had a second child called Peter, born in Nairobi on 26-3-1918.
Things went downhill and at some point she divorced Ted Wickham. A terrible disgrace for EMB/ W as she left him.
This is now, how we in Tanganyika came to understand a sad situation. We understood EMB brought the children back to the UK because the situation in Tanganyika was tough and she needed help with the welfare of Mehala and Peter. Her ex in-laws told her if she left them there she need not bother to go back for them. Her own father was dead by then.
We had no idea what had become of TW after internment, although JB told of a mutual acquaintance having seen him in Palestine in 1917 and the Forces War Records show him having served as a Temporary Lieutenant in the Kings African Rifles (KAR).
However we do know that TW was killed by an elephant in Nyeri on 19-9-1926. Felicity found the announcement in ?The Official Gazette of the Colony & Protectorate of Kenya?
Mehala?s family understood from her that EMB had ?abandoned? the two children and they lived with their father until he sent them back to the UK with a nanny.
However, Felicity?s research shows them to be on a ship?s passenger list, Mehala aged 9 and Peter aged 7. They were travelling with Reginald Trelawney Wickham and his wife Olive. He had been a civil servant in Uganda. There is also an Edith Wickham who was Ted?s half sister and she would appear to have been living with Ted to help with Mehala and Peter?
They arrived into the UK on 16-8-1925 with an immigration stamp on the passenger list.
They would therefore have been in the UK when their father Ted was killed.
Felicity also found that prior to 1927 children went to fathers automatically in the event of divorce.




EMB had in the interim married Nino de Luigi on 30-3-1921 in Nairobi, and their marriage certificate shows her to have been divorced.
They had two children ? the eldest, Giovanna Maria known as? Nina?, and Mum, Margherita Francesca known as? Marghie? or ?Buggie? by her grandchildren.
They lived in various places including on the Kenya /Tanganyika border area of Taveta. Nino was an engineer on a big sisal estate belonging to the famous ?Cape to Cairo? Colonel Grogan (I think) (Mombasa side).
They also lived near Korogwe. Possibly on another sisal estate.
For a time they ran the Namanga Hotel on the Kenya/Tanganyika border (South of Nairobi) where, in his spare time, Nino was an honorary game warden working towards Amboseli. They also ran a health clinic for the Masai as they frequently had ?run ins? with lion etc. This was an exciting time for Nina and Marghie, as Namanga had a lot of game including leopard that used to hang around at night trying to get the pet dogs. It was also dangerous to get back to their rooms as the buffaloes could be grazing nearby and be totally invisible. Mum always remembered it as good place to live. She was a bush baby by nature I think.
Another stop for them was Arusha. Here they ran a garage opposite the famous New Arusha Hotel (NAH). This was in 1930 according to David Read who grew up in and around Arusha at the same time.
Arusha was the midpoint between Cape Town and Cairo.
The NAH was run by Raymond and Marjory Ulyate and they used to take walking and vehicle safaris to Serengetti with the help of Kenyon a son.
WW2 started on 3-9-1939.
Then on 10-6-1940 Nino was interned because he was an Italian living in British Tanganyika. It was decided that all Germans, Polish, Italians etc, were to be interned in South Africa to stop them being troublesome. They left a HOT Tanganyika by sea and arrive in SA in mid-winter and were taken to a prisoner of war camp at Koffiefontein in the Orange Free State. A very cold place in winter and they had no warm clothes. Nino got bronco pneumonia and died on 1-8-1940.
EMB/de Luigi was also interned along with Marghie, I think, at Lushoto in Tanganyika?s Usumbara Mountains.
I don?t know a lot about their time there, but as ever not easy.




Nina married John Laws, a surveyor, and had 7 children: Daphne, Helen, Peter, William, Joan, Ann and Felicity. They remained in Tanganyika, also farming, for many years before returning to the UK. Nina died in August this year, 2014.
After the war Marghie was married to Kenyon and they were allocated farm land at West Kilimanjaro. Ken had been in the KAR, but had been invalided out with a burst appendix. For the rest of the war he went on to run farms with Italian prisoners of war. The prisoners were happy to work rather than go back into the war or back to Italy. Some never left. Ken and Marghie had 3 children, Robin, Phyllis and me, Sally. Mum died in June 2013.
EMB/deL also got a small farm there where she had some cattle in really thorny, stony country. It was a simple life she led. She, as many, had no electricity and her water came from a water furrow which ran past her back door, taken out of the river by division box. She loved to knit and kept us all warm with jerseys and Ken in socks. She had an enormous passion for cricket and there was nothing she didn?t know about it. She used to sit and listen to the BBC, especially for cricket, and knit.
I always thought it was a scary place as she used to sit with her front door open and look out towards Longido and Lengai mountains. The door would be left open until quite late as it was hot and she had ever so many leopards around for cats and dogs. She lived quite near the North River off Kilimanjaro.
EMB/deL also loved to go for an afternoon?s walk along the cattle tracks, midst stones and thorn bushes with her dogs.
She was attacked by Africans with machetes one night. They were looking for her shotgun which was under her mattress. Luckily for her, in the dark, they used the wrong side of the ?panga? so; she was bashed up, but otherwise OK. She was quite unfazed. How tough she was!
After that, Ken put ?weld mesh? on her windows. The leopards were known to come to the windows because her dogs were in her bedroom. They served a dual purpose as far as I was concerned.
She was a very important part of our farming community as she was such a character. She had various little cars that she drove around the district and to the Post Office. Later on in life her driving skills slipped a bit and we always knew when she had hit a rock (there were a lot) because there would be a slick of oil and her car with a damaged engine.
In due course the Tanzania Government decided that all land belonged to the Government. She was allowed to stay on in her house and have her little garden. She remained remarkably independent with the family in general keeping an eye on her, especially Marghie. We saw her most days even though the road to her house was not always very good - more than once going by tractor after a lot of rain.



Marghie and Ken supported ?Bama? physically and financially for many years with John and Nina helping out.
The day she died, she was rushing around to see Robin and wife Janet, then to the post office. She had been to see Phyllis and husband Bob before arriving at our house at about 9.30am. We had just finished spraying the cattle and said to her to ?come in for a coffee?. ?No, no, I have to go as I have no houseboy today and I have a lot to do?.
At about 10pm her houseboy and gardener arrived at our house, having walked about 5 miles through the river and countryside to get to Marghie?s house. They told how she had called them from her window and they ran to her. They knew she was in trouble so one held her hand whilst the other went and got her some brandy. They then just sat and looked after her until it was all over. Then they walked to tell us she had died. This was on 28-8-1973.
Due to there being no funeral directors, Phyllis, a nurse, Janet and I had to lay her out. Not nice, her being our ?Bama?. Next day she went, in her coffin, to Moshi church on the back of a Toyota Land Cruiser pickup truck. After the service a cousin offered the services of his covered Land Rover to take her to the cemetery. A little bit of dignity finally. She would have absolutely loved the whole thing.
She is now buried in Moshi cemetery in Tanzania along with many other people she knew over the years.
A couple of years later we all had our farms taken away by the Government and Marghie was relieved that ?Bama? did not have to do a massive move at her age.
We understand she never went back to the UK, but that there was some reconciliation with her mother who visited her in Tanganyika.

Brancker family background:
We have traced the Brancker family back to Thomas Brancker (1633-1676), a mathematician, teacher and ordained minister, whose pupils include Christopher Wren. The name Peter Whitfield Brancker recurs in succeeding generations, including a Lord Mayor of Liverpool in 1801 who was a noted slave trader. The family also included at least one other ordained minister before EMB?s father.
Peter Whitfield Brancker - EMBs father. He rowed for Cambridge from 1884 to 1886. They won in 1886. I have a lot of his medals at home.
He was Vicar of Corfe from 1897 to 1907. He then went to Brent Knoll until he died in 1919.



A couple of other particularly notable family members were:
Sir Sefton Brancker born 22-3-1877 was a cousin. He was totally mad about planes and flying. A terrible pilot due to poor eyesight but that did not stop him. He was a pioneer in aviation routes going all over Europe, India and Africa. In the then ?air force? he became Air Vice Marshall and later British Director of Civil Aviation
He got involved with airships but was not totally convinced by them. Someone called him a ?Coward? as he was unhappy with the way the R101 was being built. In the end he was on that last flight the saw the R101 crash at Beavais in France. He died there on 5-10-1930.
Mary Brancker CBE born 19-8-1914. Was a pioneering female Vet. She was given a choice of careers as her mother was financially stretched. Left school and qualified as a vet in 1937. With the onset of war she very quickly made her place in the profession. She got involved with veterinary politics. She eventually became the British Veterinary Assoc. first female president. At the age of 90 she went flying for the first time. Mary had a brother Henry Paul Brancker who was a pilot in WW2, killed over Holland. Mary died aged 95 on 18-7-2010.









 
Evelyn Mary Brancker
 
13 History of Evelyn Mary Brancker by Sally Copp

EMB/deL also got a small farm there where she had some cattle in really thorny, stony country. It was a simple life she led. She, as many, had no electricity and her water came from a water furrow which ran past her back door, taken out of the river by division box. She loved to knit and kept us all warm with jerseys and Ken in socks. She had an enormous passion for cricket and there was nothing she didn?t know about it. She used to sit and listen to the BBC, especially for cricket, and knit.
I always thought it was a scary place as she used to sit with her front door open and look out towards Longido and Lengai mountains. The door would be left open until quite late as it was hot and she had ever so many leopards around for cats and dogs. She lived quite near the North River off Kilimanjaro.
EMB/deL also loved to go for an afternoon?s walk along the cattle tracks, midst stones and thorn bushes with her dogs.
She was attacked by Africans with machetes one night. They were looking for her shotgun which was under her mattress. Luckily for her, in the dark, they used the wrong side of the ?panga? so; she was bashed up, but otherwise OK. She was quite unfazed. How tough she was!
After that, Ken put ?weld mesh? on her windows. The leopards were known to come to the windows because her dogs were in her bedroom. They served a dual purpose as far as I was concerned.
She was a very important part of our farming community as she was such a character. She had various little cars that she drove around the district and to the Post Office. Later on in life her driving skills slipped a bit and we always knew when she had hit a rock (there were a lot) because there would be a slick of oil and her car with a damaged engine.
In due course the Tanzania Government decided that all land belonged to the Government. She was allowed to stay on in her house and have her little garden. She remained remarkably independent with the family in general keeping an eye on her, especially Marghie. We saw her most days even though the road to her house was not always very good - more than once going by tractor after a lot of rain.



Marghie and Ken supported ?Bama? physically and financially for many years with John and Nina helping out.
The day she died, she was rushing around to see Robin and wife Janet, then to the post office. She had been to see Phyllis and husband Bob before arriving at our house at about 9.30am. We had just finished spraying the cattle and said to her to ?come in for a coffee?. ?No, no, I have to go as I have no houseboy today and I have a lot to do?.
At about 10pm her houseboy and gardener arrived at our house, having walked about 5 miles through the river and countryside to get to Marghie?s house. They told how she had called them from her window and they ran to her. They knew she was in trouble so one held her hand whilst the other went and got her some brandy. They then just sat and looked after her until it was all over. Then they walked to tell us she had died. This was on 28-8-1973.
Due to there being no funeral directors, Phyllis, a nurse, Janet and I had to lay her out. Not nice, her being our ?Bama?. Next day she went, in her coffin, to Moshi church on the back of a Toyota Land Cruiser pickup truck. After the service a cousin offered the services of his covered Land Rover to take her to the cemetery. A little bit of dignity finally. She would have absolutely loved the whole thing.
She is now buried in Moshi cemetery in Tanzania along with many other people she knew over the years.
A couple of years later we all had our farms taken away by the Government and Marghie was relieved that ?Bama? did not have to do a massive move at her age.
We understand she never went back to the UK, but that there was some reconciliation with her mother who visited her in Tanganyika.
 
Evelyn Mary Brancker
 
14 Notes on Evelyn Mary Brancker History
from Josephine Wesley, second daughter of Mehala Mary Whalley Wickham

Ted Wickham?s full name was Edmund Hugh Whalley Wickham.
Ted?s younger brother Reginald was known as Rex, his wife was known to us as Molly, our great aunt Molly, who lived into her nineties and had two sons , Anthony and David [who is still alive]. Ted died in a driving accident in Africa just before the 2nd World War and the two boys were brought up by their mother in Somerset as part of the extended Wickham family. David is very interested in the family history and he and his son Rex have a lot of detailed records.

The mother of Ted and Rex, Rose (?) Wickham died young, and our great grandfather, Archdale Palmer Wickham, married again and had three more children: Kenneth, Christine and Stella. Edith Wickham is not a name I have ever heard before.
I believe Mehala and Peter were taken home to visit their grandparents more than once: presumably on the trip in 1925 and also earlier than this as there are photographs taken in England at the Somerset vicarage dated July 1922 .
I have found one photograph showing children having a tea party on what was clearly a ship ? it would be hard to identify individuals but on the back is written ?Rex, Stewardess, Totie? matching the position of three figures in the picture. Totie was the nickname by which Mehala was known throughout her childhood ? I think it is Swahili for baby or toddler. The girl in the picture looks as though she could be about 9, so it could have been taken on the 1925 trip.
Rex worked as an Agricultural officer in (I think) Uganda until his death in the late thirties so he could well have travelled backwards and forwards on leave and taken the children with him.

There are several photographs of Mehala and Peter in England where they appear to be about 6 and 4. In one charming picture of Peter wearing a smock and with long fair curly hair he is holding a small cricket bat and ball.
There are many pictures when they were older children, often playing in the vicarage grounds or with their grandfather, and they always look very happy and carefree.
I can find only a couple of pictures taken in Africa, both taken around the same time. Peter is looking older, maybe 5 or 6, his hair is now cut shorter in a proper ?boy?s style?, Mehala could be 7 or 8. They are with their father and two other adults who could well be Rex and Molly and all appear to be holding small puppies.

I found one picture whose significance I had not recognized before: it is a wedding photo taken in a garden with a younger looking Ted in a smart suit with his bride in a wedding dress and hat, holding a bouquet. The back of the photo is marked ?Wedding Brent Knoll?, so this does definitely seem to be a photo recording the marriage of Ted and Evelyn in April 1914, and is the only picture I have seen of our grandmother.

I remember being told my mother she had a clear memory of living in Africa, of enjoying living in a hut/house with a mud floor where she could play and being disappointed when her father proudly had a wooden floor installed. She retained a few words of Swahili which she remembered speaking well to the servants and her nanny, and she was delighted in the last few years when she was living in the Abbeyfield Home that she could still exchange a few words with the Kenyan care assistants.

She spoke very little about her mother in our childhood, I don?t remember knowing anything about the story until the issue of the inheritance came up, but what she did say was that Peter was particularly upset and remained so. The impression was given that her mother left her father and that an Italian, who had maybe been in the internment camp had been involved. I think she felt rejected.
She did talk of the journey travelling back to England with Peter and a nanny. She had a very clear memory of being met by her aunt Stella, perhaps 15 years her senior, who came cycling to the station to meet them with her hair flying.
There was a strong feeling of disapproval of the marriage breakdown expressed by her grandparents but her childhood in Somerset seems to have been very happy ? the clergy families had a certain social status, generous sized houses and plenty of free time if not much money, so there were plenty of tennis parties, bathing trips etc. The fact that her grandfathers second marriage meant that she had relatively young aunts and an uncle, as well as her cousins, children of Rex, living in the extended family helped to form a large social group.

There is no doubt that the loss of her mother did scar her, but with so little knowledge it is impossible to know the full twists and turns of the story. I am also sure that the early and unexpected death of our father was an additional blow that made it hard to think of her youth and the loss of her father ? all these tragedies may have been related in her mind.

I have not yet put my hands on the document which recounts the story of Ted?s botched attempt to escape from the internment camp ? it is in one pile or another and I will search it out. It shows him as an adventurous but modest, humorous young man appreciative of the kindness of the German officer who on his recapture gave only the most minimal punishment and was concerned about his welfare.

The theme of clergy marriages in the West Country is interesting: Ted son of a vicar marries Evelyn daughter of a neighbouring vicar, Mehala grand-daughter of a vicar marries Jack Trevaldwyn, son of another vicar. Martock, East Brent, Brent Knoll, Marldon are all so close to each other; social life must have been dominated by the county and the church and maybe some marriages took place just because of these limited horizons.

 
Evelyn Mary Brancker
 
15 Dr James Franck Bright MA DD (born 29 May 1832 in London; died October 1920) was a British historian and Master of University College, Oxford.[1]

Franck Bright was the son of the physician Richard Bright. He was educated at Rugby and University College, Oxford,[2] and was then master at Marlborough College, where he was Head of the Modern Department for sixteen years. Bright became a history tutor at Balliol College in 1872, Dean of University College in 1874, and Master of Univ from 1881 to 1906.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/James_Franck_Bright 
James Franck Bright
 
16 Attended Tiffin School from 1947
1956 Peterhouse College, Cambridge Economics & History
1959 to 1997 Secondary school teacher, mainly in Reading at James Theale Green Community School. Wrote and appeared in many of the schools musical productions.
After retirement in 1997 "built an allotment empire" in Tilehurst and enjoyed a vast CD collection and European travel. 
Brian Leonard Cottee
 
17 Surgeon at Bridgwater, Somerset Hill Dawe
 
18 Minister of Stronzay George Graeme
 
19 Rector of Lochmaben
to London 1697 to Barbados 1698 
George Graeme
 
20 Patrick Graeme of Inchbrackie and Aberuthven Patrick Graeme, of Inchbrakie and Aberuthven
 
21 Sheriff of Berwik David Graham, of Dundaff
 
22 Sister of William Hay of Delgatty Lilias Hay, of Dalgety
 
23 High Sheriff of Wiltshire in 1689. Lived in Cholderton, Wilts Jonathan Hill
 
24 Obituary in the Telegraph 29 May 2004
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/obituaries/1463104/Sheila-Wickham.html




Sheila Wickham, who has died aged 87, was one of the beautiful Macneal twins, known to pilots of 92 Squadron during the Battle of Britain as the "Belles of Biggin Hill".

In 1940 the twins were living in The Red House at Brasted, in Kent. The house was not far from the White Hart pub, the favourite watering hole of the pilots whose Spitfire squadron was based seven miles away at Biggin Hill. Here they would relax in the evenings, attempting to dismiss from their minds what the next mission might bring; many of them signed their names on one of the pub's wooden blackout blinds, which is now in the Shoreham Aircraft Museum.

Among them were some of the most resonant names from the Battle of Britain: men such as Bob Stanford Tuck, Brian Kingcome and Tony Bartley (who would become the husband of the film star Deborah Kerr).

On most evenings during the Battle of Britain the Macneal twins would call in at the White Hart. At the time, Sheila was a young widow; Moira's husband was serving in the Middle East. Brian Kingcome, who was later to marry Sheila's daughter, Lesley, described the Macneal twins as "tall, elegant, sophisticated and beautiful young women . . . They exuded the indefinable quality that comes from impeccable taste".

Bartley later recalled a typical evening after closing time at the White Hart: " 'Who's for The Red House?', said one of the twins . . . There was a unanimous howl of approval . . . We piled into the station wagon like sardines again, and after a short drive arrived in front of a fine old red-brick manor house. The twins had gone ahead and were waiting for us at the door. I was shown into the drawing room and had a very large whisky thrust into my hand. Someone put on the radiogram."

To the airmen, the house became a kind of sanctuary, where late at night they could dance, drink some more and listen to one of their number, Bob Holland, playing the piano. Richard Hillary, author of The Last Enemy, spent part of his convalescence at The Red House when he was recovering from the terrible burns he suffered when he was shot down in 1940.

Sheila Marjorie Macneal and her identical twin Moira were born in Edinburgh on July 1 1916. Their father, Sir Hector Macneal (known as "the black knight"), was in shipping, and during the Second World War worked for Lord Beaverbrook at the Ministry for Aircraft Production; their mother was a member of the Henderson shipping family.

After private school in Edinburgh, the twins were dispatched to a finishing school in Switzerland, from which they were expelled for climbing out of the dormitory at night. Both girls were beautiful, elegant and stood 6 ft tall, and when they appeared on the scene in London they attracted many suitors. In 1935 Sheila married Squadron Leader Freddie Shute, with whom she had a daughter, Lesley. She learned to fly, and accompanied her husband when he went rally driving. Freddie, who also raced Bentleys at Brooklands, was killed early in the war; he was piloting a Gladiator when he was lost over the North Sea. Meanwhile, Moira Macneal married in 1936. Her husband, also a pilot, was posted abroad, and by 1940 Moira was living at The Red House, where Sheila and her infant daughter joined her.

Even after the Battle of Britain, the house remained a popular haunt for airmen, and in 1944 Sheila married another fighter pilot, Peter Wickham; but the marriage failed within a year.

Sheila Wickham was an old friend of Lord Beaverbrook's daughter, Janet Kydd, and went to live with her in Somerset, where together they bred North Holland Blue chickens. When Janet Kydd bought Holders, her house in Barbados, Sheila went too, starting an antiques business on the island.

In her late fifties she returned to Britain, living for the rest of her life at Queen Alexandra's Court, Wimbledon, the home for the widows, divorcees and unmarried daughters of officers.

Moira divorced her first husband, with whom she had two children, shortly before the end of the war, later marrying twice more. She died 23 years ago.

Sheila Wickham died on May 23, and is survived by her daughter.
 
Sheila Marjorie Macneal
 
25 Freeman of the City of York Benjamin Mancklin
 
26 Archdale Palmer was an MP in 1695 for Leicester

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leicester_%28UK_Parliament_constituency%29 
Archdale Palmer
 
27 Archdale PALMER, s/o William and Barbara ARCHDALE Palmer, was not baptised until 1610, and presumably born that same year, thus only 13 years of age in 1623 (Vann's Alumni, Cantabrigienses, Cambridge University, states Archdale died 6 Aug 1673 at age &73). Archdale Palmer
 
28 Cambridge Alumni 1627-1628 Archdale Palmer
 
29 BLG1952 (Rose of Kilravock) does not show a wife for this laird. However, BLG1952 (Mackintosh of Mackintosh) shows a Mora Mackintosh, daughter of William Mackintosh, 7th that ilk, as having married a Hugh Rose of Kilravock. This Mora was just one generation before the Moira who married Hugh Rose, 7th of Kilravock (see below). It is quite possible that Mora was mother of  Hugh Rose, 5th of Kilravock
 
30 Hugh Rose of Geddes witnessed Charter of Beauly Priory in 1219

 
Hugh Rose, of Geddes
 
31 Sheriff of Inverness Hugh Rose, 10th of Kilravock
 
32 d.v.p. - "died vp," died before his father. Lachlan Rose
 
33 nat son of Duke of Albany
brother of James IV
 
Alexander Stewart
 
34 Daughter of Alexander Stewart, Lord Fleming, natural son of Duke of Albany - brother of James IV Margaret Stewart
 
35 Harriet STRONG was related to the Rev. Thomas Watson STRONG rector of Brean SOM Harriet Elizabeth Strong
 
36 Mention of Jack in the Delegation

http://www.fao.org/docrep/meeting/007/AC947E/AC947E04.htm

NITED KINGDOM

Sir Ralph Enfield, Chief Economic Adviser, Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries, London, Representative

Albert E. Feaveryear, Deputy Secretary, Ministry of Food, London, Alternate

J.R. Trevaldwyn, United Kingdom Treasury and Supply Delegation, Washington, D.C., U.S.A., Associate

Berwyn Felton, Principal, Ministry of Food, London, Adviser

J.C.W. Bushell, Second Secretary (Commercial), British Embassy, Rome Adviser

Miss Mary E. Chalk, Ministry of Food, Secretary 
John Reginald Trevaldwyn
 
37 Works of art belonging to the late Baron de Rothschild.?
http://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/SearchUI/Details?uri=C13370811


Reference:
FO 371/45770/20
Description:

Registry Number: UE 3788/123/77. Works of art belonging to the late Baron de Rothschild. Letter from Mr Coulson at the Foreign Office to Herbert Smith and Company, solicitors, referring to correspondence with the Foreign Office regarding the inventory of works of art belonging to the late Baron de Rothschild, dated 4 September 1945. Provides details of real estate in Vienna owned by Baroness de Rothschild and requests that the necessary authorities are informed of her claim in order to protect her interests. Asks also that details of any works of art referred to in an enclosed copy of a letter to the British Committee for the Preservation and Restitution of Works of Art may be passed to Herbert Smith and Company should they be recovered, dated 1 July 1945. Letter from Herbert Smith to the Under Secretary of State at the Foreign Office, conveying that Baroness Clarice de Rothschild's estate at Langau in Austria has been completely looted by Russian occupation troops and requesting the protection of His Majesty's Government with regard to this matter, dated 8 October 1945. States that 'we shall be obliged if steps can be taken to recover this property on behalf of our client'. Letter from Mr Mackenzie at the Foreign Office to Herbert Smith and Company, stating that the request to protect the interests of Baroness de Rothschild has been transmitted to the relevant British military authorities concerned for such action as they may be able to take, dated 25 October 1945. Letter from Herbert Smith to the Under Secretary of State at the Foreign Office, enclosing a list of Baroness de Rothschild's real estate in Vienna, Austria, dated 22 August 1945. Encloses a list of looted works of art in a letter to the Macmillan Committee, asking that if her art is found, Herbert Smith and Company should be informed. Letter from Herbert Smith and Company, solicitors, to Miss Clay, Assistant Secretary of the Macmillan Committee, enclosing a list of Baroness Clarice de Rothschild's works of art that have been looted, dated 11 July 1945. Specific works of art include: A Rembrandt Portrait, 'Portrait of a Lady' by Romney, 'Blind Man's Buff' by Fragonard, 'Portrait of a Lady in a Ruff' by Frans Hals, 'Portrait of a Man' by A van Dyck, 'A Garden Scene' by Watteau, 'Portrait of a Man' by Frans Hals, 'Portrait of a Young Man' by Hans Holbein. Copies of this letter were sent by Mr Mackenzie at the Foreign Office to Lt-Col Sir L Woolley at the War Office, dated 1 September 1945. A copy was sent to Mr Carter at the Trading with the Enemy Department, dated 4 September 1945. A copy was sent to J R Trevaldwyn at the War Office, dated 25 October 1945. Letter from Mr Trevaldwyn at the War Office to Mr Mackenzie at the Foreign Office, stating that this correspondence had been forwarded to the Property Control Branch at the War Office, dated 27 October 1945. Letter from Herbert Smith and Company to the Under Secretary of State, acknowledging that the British military authorities were now taking action to protect Baroness de Rothschild's property at Langau, dated 29 October 1945.

Date:
1945 July 11 - 1945 October 29
Held by:
The National Archives, Kew
Legal status:
Public Record
Language:
English
 
John Reginald Trevaldwyn
 
38 Josephine's Tribute - taken from service sheet at Mehala's funeral

Mother and father - Ted Wickham, the sone of crickey playing vicar of East Brent, AP Wickham - were living in Tanganika as coffee planters when overtaken by World War 1 and interned in a camp in Tabora in German East Africa where Mehala was born in 1916 and her brother Peter two years later. Ted wrote that they were well looked after, but the marriage broke down and after the war Ted looked after the two children himself.

Mehala remembered the time fondly, especially living in a house with a dirt floor in which one "could make mud pies", but misfortune struck again and her father was killed in a hunting accident in 1922. The two children were sent home by boat in the care of a nanny to be brought up by their paternal grandparents.

This was a sad beginning that marked their live, but the childhood in the Somerset Vicarage seems in many ways to have been idyllic. They had lost their parents but were surrounded by an extended family with many aunts, uncles and cousins.

Boarding at a school where one of the aunts taught [Aunt Stella? Ed] was enjoyed and after that Mehala, always very athletic and a good swimmer, tried training at a PE college but only stayed for a term. She tried a Domestic Science course, but didn't enjoy that either.

 
Mehala Mary Whalley Trevaldwyn
 
39 Josephines Tribute - 2

The next step showed courage and independence: she spent two years as an au pair in France, one in Bordeaux with a family who were neighbours of the Mitterand family and she helped improve the English of the two sons - Francois went on to become President of France of course - and she developed very good French herself. Photos from this time show Mehala as an attractive auburn-headed beauty with a lively circle of friends swimming and skiing.

Mehala returned to England in the late thirties. She had already met Jack through family friends in the West Country and they married in 1940. Jack was a talented mathematician who had joined the civil service and worked in the War Office and after the war, for the Treasury.

We three children arrived in 1941, 43 and 46 and I am sure life seemed very settled and happy.
In 1947/8 Jack was appointed to the UK delegation to the newly formed Food and Agriculture Delegation in Washington DC and the whole family moved to America.

I am sure it was a very stimulating and interesting opportunity and could have led to a long and valuable career. My childhood memories of this period are of lots os exciting experience away from the austerity of England.

Sadly Mehala was struck by another terrible blow just when life seemed full of promise. Back pain was diagnosed as TB and Jack died suddenly and unexpectedly in the early stages of treatment.
 
Mehala Mary Whalley Trevaldwyn
 
40 Josephines Tribute - 3

To find yourself all at once widowed with three small children far from home and with no family close at hand must have been terrible and Mehala was distraught, but she was also always courageous and never gave up.

Another loss a few years later was the death of her brother Peter (Peter Wickham died on 29 April 1970) who had a spectacular war time career as a much decorated air force pilot, but who never found his place in civilian life.

We got back from America to the home in East Sheen (SW London) where we had lived before and our lives were made as happy as possible.
Mehala was a super Mum, always open to adventures and excitements that had to be managed on a limited budget.

We ran wild on Palewell Common, went exploring with picnics of jam sandwiches in Richmond Park and climbed trees and made dens all over the place. We went swimming and skating and had long walks on the Thames towpath to Kew Gardens. There were holidays at a litle B&B in Cornwall where I remember Mum painting the glorious colours of the heather - I was very impressed with her skill. We also stayed at cousin Anthony Wickham's cottage in Devon, where Jenny and I both developed a love of growing vegetables (and Anthony got us tiddly on cider)
 
Mehala Mary Whalley Trevaldwyn
 
41 Josephines Tribute - 4

It would have been sufficient just to raise 3 children on her own, but it was characteristic of Mehala's energy and ability that she was actively involved with the parent association, produced costumes for pantomime and was a member of the Home Safety committee. As we grew older and more independent, she took book-keeping courses and got jobs with local firms as a bookkeeper, then to earn better wages started travelling into London, eventually working with Thomas Cook. She had a responsible job in the finance department as a comptometer operator, the forerunner of the computer systems. Nowadays I am sure she would have held a senior position.

At the same time Mehala found time to follow her political interests. Spurred by Jenny's involvement in CND she joined the local group then the London Region group and was active as a treasurer and fund raiser. Marching from Aldermaston each Easter became a regular family outing, Mum always in the thick of things organising and trying to subdue the more boisterous young marchers. It was an excellent education to us about the need to be active in support of our beliefs and interests. In addition it introduced us to a range of people in the arts and left wing politics that widened our experience and sympathies.
Meeting Vanessa Redgrace, seeing early productions of Brendan Behan plays and Oh What a Lovely War, heading Ewan Maccoll and Peggy Seegar all arose from Mums active involvment.

Her determination that we should all be well educated followed from her family background with a number of distinguished teachers and alsos her experience of the need to make a living. Our careers we owe to her efforts. 
Mehala Mary Whalley Trevaldwyn
 
42 Mehala's name comes from a novel of the early 1900s by S Baring Gould Mehala Mary Whalley Trevaldwyn
 
43 Notes on Evelyn Mary Brancker History
from Josephine Wesley, second daughter of Mehala Mary Whalley Wickham

Ted Wickham?s full name was Edmund Hugh Whalley Wickham.
Ted?s younger brother Reginald was known as Rex, his wife was known to us as Molly, our great aunt Molly, who lived into her nineties and had two sons , Anthony and David [who is still alive]. Ted died in a driving accident in Africa just before the 2nd World War and the two boys were brought up by their mother in Somerset as part of the extended Wickham family. David is very interested in the family history and he and his son Rex have a lot of detailed records.

The mother of Ted and Rex, Rose (?) Wickham died young, and our great grandfather, Archdale Palmer Wickham, married again and had three more children: Kenneth, Christine and Stella. Edith Wickham is not a name I have ever heard before.
I believe Mehala and Peter were taken home to visit their grandparents more than once: presumably on the trip in 1925 and also earlier than this as there are photographs taken in England at the Somerset vicarage dated July 1922 .
I have found one photograph showing children having a tea party on what was clearly a ship ? it would be hard to identify individuals but on the back is written ?Rex, Stewardess, Totie? matching the position of three figures in the picture. Totie was the nickname by which Mehala was known throughout her childhood ? I think it is Swahili for baby or toddler. The girl in the picture looks as though she could be about 9, so it could have been taken on the 1925 trip.
Rex worked as an Agricultural officer in (I think) Uganda until his death in the late thirties so he could well have travelled backwards and forwards on leave and taken the children with him.

There are several photographs of Mehala and Peter in England where they appear to be about 6 and 4. In one charming picture of Peter wearing a smock and with long fair curly hair he is holding a small cricket bat and ball.
There are many pictures when they were older children, often playing in the vicarage grounds or with their grandfather, and they always look very happy and carefree.
I can find only a couple of pictures taken in Africa, both taken around the same time. Peter is looking older, maybe 5 or 6, his hair is now cut shorter in a proper ?boy?s style?, Mehala could be 7 or 8. They are with their father and two other adults who could well be Rex and Molly and all appear to be holding small puppies.

I found one picture whose significance I had not recognized before: it is a wedding photo taken in a garden with a younger looking Ted in a smart suit with his bride in a wedding dress and hat, holding a bouquet. The back of the photo is marked ?Wedding Brent Knoll?, so this does definitely seem to be a photo recording the marriage of Ted and Evelyn in April 1914, and is the only picture I have seen of our grandmother.

I remember being told my mother she had a clear memory of living in Africa, of enjoying living in a hut/house with a mud floor where she could play and being disappointed when her father proudly had a wooden floor installed. She retained a few words of Swahili which she remembered speaking well to the servants and her nanny, and she was delighted in the last few years when she was living in the Abbeyfield Home that she could still exchange a few words with the Kenyan care assistants.

She spoke very little about her mother in our childhood, I don?t remember knowing anything about the story until the issue of the inheritance came up, but what she did say was that Peter was particularly upset and remained so. The impression was given that her mother left her father and that an Italian, who had maybe been in the internment camp had been involved. I think she felt rejected.
She did talk of the journey travelling back to England with Peter and a nanny. She had a very clear memory of being met by her aunt Stella, perhaps 15 years her senior, who came cycling to the station to meet them with her hair flying.
There was a strong feeling of disapproval of the marriage breakdown expressed by her grandparents but her childhood in Somerset seems to have been very happy ? the clergy families had a certain social status, generous sized houses and plenty of free time if not much money, so there were plenty of tennis parties, bathing trips etc. The fact that her grandfathers second marriage meant that she had relatively young aunts and an uncle, as well as her cousins, children of Rex, living in the extended family helped to form a large social group.

There is no doubt that the loss of her mother did scar her, but with so little knowledge it is impossible to know the full twists and turns of the story. I am also sure that the early and unexpected death of our father was an additional blow that made it hard to think of her youth and the loss of her father ? all these tragedies may have been related in her mind.

I have not yet put my hands on the document which recounts the story of Ted?s botched attempt to escape from the internment camp ? it is in one pile or another and I will search it out. It shows him as an adventurous but modest, humorous young man appreciative of the kindness of the German officer who on his recapture gave only the most minimal punishment and was concerned about his welfare.

The theme of clergy marriages in the West Country is interesting: Ted son of a vicar marries Evelyn daughter of a neighbouring vicar, Mehala grand-daughter of a vicar marries Jack Trevaldwyn, son of another vicar. Martock, East Brent, Brent Knoll, Marldon are all so close to each other; social life must have been dominated by the county and the church and maybe some marriages took place just because of these limited horizons.

 
Mehala Mary Whalley Trevaldwyn
 
44 First Curate of the village of Marldon in Devon
http://www.marldonhistory.co.uk/html/archive_data.html
 
Reverend Reginald Francis Holyoke Trevaldwyn
 
45 http://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db=pubmembertrees&rank=1&gsln=Trevaldwyn&gskw= Reverend Reginald Francis Holyoke Trevaldwyn
 
46 came to England from Normandy. French ancestry is Du Vassall, who were Barons de Guerdon in Querci Perigord John Vassall
 
47 Lived mainly in USA, Boston.

some info here https://books.google.co.uk/books?id=NFDUyV_BYAYC&lpg=PA380&ots=8RBHGcUibU&dq=William%20Vassall%201715%20-%201800&pg=PA25#v=onepage&q=William%20Vassall%201715%20-%201800&f=false


Leonard Vassall of Jamaica granted land for the construction of
Boston's Trinity Church in 1730. His son William (1715?1800) studied
56
at Harvard, where he graduated in 1733 and received an MA in 1743.
William's brother Florentius later arranged for a marble memorial
from London to be erected in the King's Chapel in Boston, com-
memorating Samuel Vassall's stance against Charles I's extra-parlia-
mentary taxation, and also the action of John Vassall in fighting the
Armada.57 The timing of this gesture, executed during the Stamp Act
controversy, is significant. Once war broke out in 1776, however, the
Vassalls elected to remain loyal to Britain, whatever sympathies they
may earlier have harboured for colonial grievances. The family's private
business affairs were too closely aligned with the apparatus of colonial
administration and regulation for detachment to be a feasible option.
Because of his Loyalist stance, William Vassall was forced to return to
England in 1775; subsequently, he suffered confiscation of his American
property.58



 
Leonard Vassall
 
48 more info can be found at https://www.myheritage.com/names/william_vassell
look under 1715.

mentioned in books called:

Vassalls of New England and Their Immediate Descendants
Loyalists of Massachusetts
John Adams: Writings from the New Nation 1784-1826 ( see https://books.google.co.uk/books?id=Il5xDAAAQBAJ&pg=PT1036&lpg=PT1036&dq=William+Vassall+1715+-+1800&source=bl&ots=qrrVLuiyMU&sig=ACfU3U2_qVbhXlzdUn6ojFdKneNabh8gqw&hl=en&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwj32tWbq_fpAhVPQkEAHUhpA34Q6AEwBXoECAoQAQ#v=onepage&q=William%20Vassall%201715%20-%201800&f=false)
This book says he attended Harvard in 1733




 
William Vassall
 
49 Of Boston (and later of Battersea Rise Clapham). American Loyalist exiled in 1775. William Vassall
 
50 portrait in san francisco: https://art.famsf.org/john-singleton-copley/william-vassall-and-his-son-leonard-1979730 William Vassall
 

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