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51 slave plantation owner in Jamaica: https://www.ucl.ac.uk/lbs/person/view/2146634160




William Vassall senior
Profile & Legacies Summary

1715 - 1800
Biography

Of Boston (and later of Battersea Rise Clapham). American Loyalist exiled in 1775. Father of William Vassall (q.v.).

William Vassall was listed in the Jamaican Quit Rent books for 1754 as the owner of 963 acres of land in Hanover.

Will of William Vassall of Battersea Surrey proved 08/08/1800. Under the will he left his ten children annuities totalling 1430 p.a., increased by a codicil of 1799 to 1990 p.a., all secured on Green Castle estate. The structure varied among his children: in the case of two of his younger sons and four unmarried daughters, he left each 3000 [subsequently increased to 5000] each, with an annuity of 120 p.a. [for Leonard, 160 p.a.] raised to 220 p.a. each in the codicil. He left his daughter Sarah Syme an annuity of 150 p.a. with 500 each to her two children at their mother's death; and he left his daughter Lucretia the bond from her husband for 800 with punitive security of 1600 p.a. to part-fund her annuity of 120 p.a. His eldest son William received an annuity of 400 p.a. plus the Greencastle estate. His son Henry received the repayment from the estate of 2500 Henry had borrowed elsewhere for which his father had previously stood security. He left specified family portraits in his will, three by Smibert [now lost] to his son William and one by John Singleton Copley [extant, see opposite] to Leonard.


Sources

'A List of landholders in the Island of Jamaica together with the number of acres each person possessed taken from the quit rent books in the year 1754', TNA CO 142/31 transcribed at http://www.jamaicanfamilysearch.com/Samples2/1754lead.htm.

PROB 11/1346/94.

We are grateful to Barry Jolly for his assistance with compiling this entry.
Further Information
Absentee?
British/Irish
Spouse
(1) Ann Davies (2) Margaret Hubbard
Children
William; 6 das; 2 other sons
Associated Estates (2)

The dates listed below have different categories as denoted by the letters in the brackets following each date. Here is a key to explain those letter codes:

SD - Association Start Date
SY - Association Start Year
EA - Earliest Known Association
ED - Association End Date
EY - Association End Year
LA - Latest Known Association

1740 [EA] - 1800 [LA] ? Owner
Green River Estate [ Jamaica | Hanover ]
1803 [EA] - 1839 [LA] ? Previous owner
Green River Estate [ Jamaica | Hanover ]
Legacies Summary
Cultural (1)
Paintings
William Vassall and his son Leonard, portrait by John Singleton Copley c. 1770-1772. Left by William Vassall in his will proved in 1800 to his son Leonard 'his and my picture drawn in one picture by...
Details
Relationships (2)
William Vassall senior
Other relatives
Alexander Graeme
Details
Notes ?
Henry Vassall, son of William Vassall senior, married Margaret Harvie Graeme, daughter of Alexander Graeme, after the latter's...
William Vassall senior
Father ? Son
William Vassall
Details
Addresses (1)
Battersea Rise, Battersea, Surrey, London, England
Details

[William Vassall and his son Leonard]

 
William Vassall
 
52 widow of Patrick Halyburton
 
Christian Wawane, of Segy, Kinross-shire
 
53 http://www.unithistories.com/officers/RN_officersW4.html

Cadet 01.09.1936
Midsh. 01.01.1937
A/S.Lt. 01.01.1939
S.Lt. 01.03.1939
Lt. 16.12.1940
Lt.Cdr. 16.12.1948 (retd 20.05.1964)
Mention in Despatches MID 13.04.1943 Operation Torch 
Anthony Maurice Wickham
 
54 http://www.unithistories.com/officers/RN_officersW4.html

Education: RN College, Dartmouth (Admiralty No. 1294; Blake term; ...-28.07.1936).
01.09.1936 - 31.12.1936 HMS Frobisher (cadet training cruiser)
01.01.1937 - (07.)1937 HMS Royal Oak (battleship) (Home Fleet)
25.08.1937 - (10.)1938 HMS Dorsetshire (cruiser) (China)
(12.1938) no appointment listed
02.01.1939 - (04.)1939 promotion course, Portsmouth [HMS Victory]
15.06.1939 - (12.1941) HMS Velox (destroyer)
28.04.1942 - (06.)1943 HMS Zetland (destroyer) (in command?)
(08.1943) no appointment listed
31.08.1943 - (10.)1944 First Lieutenant, HMS Onslaught (destroyer)
29.10.1944 - (01.)1945 HMS Dauntless (cruiser)
(07.1945) no appointment listed
(04.1946) HM LST 358 (landing ship, tank) *
07.06.1948 - (07.)1948 HMS Terror (RN base, Singapore)
17.07.1948 - (05.)1951 RN Barracks, Singapore [HMS Terror]
30.07.1951 - (05.)1953 HMS Battleaxe
30.10.1953 - (04.1955) RN ABCD School, Devonport [HMS Drake]
(01.1956) no appointment listed
23.01.1956 - (01.)1957 HMS Mull of Galloway
20.02.1957 - (01.1959) Naval Provost Marshal, Gibraltar [HMS Rooke]
(01.1960) - (07.1961) HMS Phoenicia
(08.1962) no appointment listed
(02.1963) no appointment listed
(02.1964) no appointment listed 
Anthony Maurice Wickham
 
55 Archdale Kenneth WICKHAM97 was born in September 1897 in Yeovil SOM. He served in the military as Lieutenant between 1914 and 1920 in the Machine gun Corps. London Regiment ..97 He was awarded WW1 service medal. In 1924?1951 he was a housemaster and teacher of modern languages and history in Eton College. He was also interested in rare books, manuscripts and pictures. He founded the college Archaeological Society in 1943. (Mrs P Hatfield, Eton College Archivist)
He was also author of 'The Villages of England' 1932. And 'The Italian Renaissance' 1935. Archdale died on 20 June 1951 in Eton. Surrey..97 Parents: Rev. Archdale Palmer "Archie" WICKHAM m.a. and Harriet Elizabeth Amy STRONG.

Spouse: Raymonde Ghislane CRAWLEY. Raymonde Ghislane CRAWLEY and Archdale Kenneth WICKHAM were married on 23 December 1943.97 Children were: James John Rufus WICKHAM, Jocelyn WICKHAM. 
Archdale Kenneth Wickham
 
56 http://www.rooksbridge.org.uk/RootsMagicStuff/b224.htm#P11591


rchdale Kenneth WICKHAM144,610 was born in September 1897 in Yeovil SOM. He served in the military as Lieutenant between 1914 and 1920 in the Machine gun Corps. London Regiment ..144 . He served in France as Lieutenant between 1914 and 1920 in the Machine gun Corps. London Regiment . He was wounded in Action May 1918. He was awarded WW1 service medal. In 1924?1951 he was a housemaster and teacher of modern languages and history in Eton College. He was also author of 'The Villages of England' 1932. And 'The Italian Renaissance' 1935.
In 1924?1951 he was a housemaster and teacher of modern languages and history in Eton College.He was also interested in rare books, manuscripts and pictures. He founded the college Archaeological Society in 1943. (Mrs P Hatfield, Eton CollegeArchivist)He was also author of 'The Villages of England' 1932. And 'The Italian Renaissance' 1935.
(Mrs P Hatfield, Eton College Archivist) Archdale died on 20 June 1951 at the age of 53 in Eton. Surrey..144 Parents: Rev. Archdale Palmer "Archie" WICKHAM m.a. and Harriet Elizabeth Amy STRONG.

Spouse: Raymonde Ghislane CRAWLEY. Raymonde Ghislane CRAWLEY and Archdale Kenneth WICKHAM were married on 23 December 1943.144 My half sister, Joceline Wickham, has sent me your brief correspondence with her about her father and I hasten to follow up on it.
My mother and he had, as he used to tell anyone who was ready to listen, the most romantic of meetings.
He was sitting at his desk in his study in Hawtree House, overlooking Eton High Street, one rainy afternoon when he noticed a rather beautiful lady hastening to and just missing, a bus at the bus stop. The bus stop being unsheltered , the next bus not coming, he knew, for another hour, he felt he ought to go, umbrella in hand, and ask her in for a cup of tea. " And that's how the whole thing started" as he used to love saying.
In fact my mother was visiting Eton that day as part of her groundwork training for the guide's course which she was preparing to take.
I was down for Harrow where my family had been for generations. One of the immediate effects on me of my mother being invited to tea at Hawtree House that afternoon was that I am today an old Etonian, who, Kenneth Wickham being an excellent broker, would have, in those days, had I been his son. gone to school there for no basic fee. had gone to school there for half the basic fee.
I was born in 1930 and he in 1897, a date which I shall never forget because it was the year in which Brahms died..
My step father, Daddy to the three of us, was the most musically deaf person I've ever come across , and yet he , when he realized that I had recently discovered Brahms, encouraged me all he could. I remember he gave me for a birthday , it was probably my fourteenth, a set of 78's containing the Brahms Requiem. When , a couple of years later, I had a collection of all of Brahms' symphonies , the violin conceto , both piano concertos, etctera, I decided to glue numbers on each of the records. Unfortunately the glue was one which contained some chemical or other which penetrated through their flimsy cardboard covers and damaged each and every one of my records so that the music was regularily interspersed with a delicate swishing sound.
Daddy replaced the lot, and I remember thinking , when he did this , that he, as he used to say, almost proudly, couldn't tell the difference between God save the King and the New World Symphony:, and he couldn't.
This will always be one of the most generous and kindly unselfish things that anyone has ever done for me.
My mother, 'til the day she died, used to look as though she was years younger, whenever his name was mentioned,.
I loved him too and I consider myself fortunate to have been influenced by his moral integrity for the seven years when he and and my mother were married.
He was a delightfully old fashioned man in old fashioned ways and, to demonstrate this, allow me to tell you of another memory I have of him. I had been commissioned into the 3rd Hussars and I was home on leave from National Service for the first time at Eddington House, on the edge of the Polden Hills between Bridgewater and Street where my step father had a lovely early Georgian house which he had bought after his father had died where his mother and his two sisters lived before we came along.
The army had taught me to enjoy drinking , and so, the first evening home, I suggested that Daddy and I should go to the local pub for a beer. I knew that he liked a nice bitter and so his reaction was all the more strange to me.
" No; not the local", he said . " we are not locals and they would be embarrassed by our presence."
He never talked of his time in the army. I know he hated it and He was in the machine gun corps and he had a German bullet go through his right hand which used to bother him at times; for instance when shooting on cold days.
My sister has mentioned his book on the churches of Somerset which was published by Batsford. I remember well the happy day when he heard from the appropriate government department that he would be entitled to sufficient petrol for him to travel round the county looking at churches and taking photographs. It was a happy time for my twin brother and sister and for me too; we had been promised that if and when this day should arrive that we three would be responsible for getting the car off the stocks on which it had been since 1939 and cleaning and polishing it. And what a fun car it was: a Vauxhall four door cabriolet. I cannot remember ever seeing another one like it, but it had the Vauxhall chrome- plated indented stripe down each side of the bonnet and it was dark green in colour.
For two whole years, during their holidays, father and step son, map read by the latter, visited every church in Somerset. I loved it and my love of English ecclesiastical architecture stems entirely from those end of war days with that lovely man.
I hope that I haven't gone on for too long.
Yous sincerely, Jonathan Crawley.
Children were: James John Rufus WICKHAM, Jocelyn WICKHAM. 
Archdale Kenneth Wickham
 
57 Rev. Archdale Palmer "Archie" WICKHAM m.a.97,131 was born on 9 November 1855 in Sth Holmwood. Surrey..97 Circa 1911?1935 he was a vicar in St Marys East Brent Som..46,131 Between 1911 - 1927, he was also prebendary of Wells Cathederal. And Rural dean of Axbridge and Burnham district. He died on 13 October 1935 in East Brent Som..97,129
From the 'Times Obituary pages' 16 Oct 1935.
"Prebendary Archdale Palmer Wickham who died on Sunday, at the age of 79. He was beloved in his successive parishes.
He was a notable cricketer at Oxford. And later became a keen entomologist.
He came from an ancient Somerset family, and was the second son of Rev. Edmund Dawe Wickham, vicar of Holmwood, Surrey and his wife Emma, only daughter of Archdale Palmer of Cheam Park, Surrey. He was born in November 1855.
He was educated at Temple Grove and Marlborough where he gained a scholarship to New College Oxford, taking honours in the classics.
He kept wicket in the Oxford eleven in 1878 and later played for Norfolk and Somerset county sides.
After preparation at Leeds Clergy School he was ordained to the curacy St Stephens in Norwich in 1880. in 1889 he became vicar of Martock in Somerset. In 1904 he was collator to the prebendal stall of East Harptree at Wells Cathedral.
In 1911 he was made vicar of east Brent by the Bishop Dr Kennium.
Prebendary Wickham was a remarkable, industrious and successful entomologist. His collection of butterflies numbering many thousands. In 1917 he became a Fellow of the Royal Entomological Society of London. And a constant visitor to the Natural History Museum. One of his great achievements was 'working out' a collection of thousands of specimens from the Amazon and Rio Madeira areas brought over by one of his sons. Alarge part of it was given to the British museum.
He was twice married, and had three sons and three daughters. One of his sons is housemaster at Eton. One of his sisters was the wife of the late Dr Frank Bright, Master of University College Oxford. Another of his sisters was the wife of Mr R Bosworth-Smith a master at Harrow. (Bryan Cooper)

His wife is buried with him in the family grave beside the path on the South side of St Marys church East Brent. (JR) Archie was educated M.A. in Oxford university..
On the Nth side of the chancel is a stained glass window, dedicated to Rev. Archdale WICKHAM. It depicts his love of cricket and entomology. His extensive collection of butterflies and moths etc. and manuscripts are now in the British Museum.

Archie Wickham, Full name Archdale Palmer Wickham, played major first class cricket for Somerset and Oxford University from 1876 - 1907
Batting style Right-hand bat Fielding position Wicket-keeper
Details of his cricketing career and statistics can be found on the following link:


In 2005 The new main gates to the church was dedicated to the Rev. Wickham. Parents: Edmund Dawe WICKHAM and Edith "Emma" PALMER.

Spouse: Emily Helena M BALDWIN. Emily Helena M BALDWIN and Rev. Archdale Palmer "Archie" WICKHAM m.a. were married in March 1883 in St George. Hanover Square. London. Children were: Leila Rose WICKHAM, Reginald Trelawney WICKHAM.

Spouse: Harriet Elizabeth Amy STRONG. Harriet Elizabeth Amy STRONG and Rev. Archdale Palmer "Archie" WICKHAM m.a. were married about June 1896 in Yeovil SOM. Children were: Archdale Kenneth WICKHAM, Christine Edith B WICKHAM, Stella Jean Agnes WICKHAM m.a.. 
Archdale Palmer Wickham, m.a.
 
58 Vicar of St Mary Magdalene, South Holmwood
http://www.exploringsurreyspast.org.uk/themes/places/surrey/mole_valley/holmwood/south_holmwood_church_of_st_mary_magdalene 
Edmund Dawe Wickham
 
59 Lived in Tanganika ( German East Africa at the time) with his wife as coffee planters. When the first world war started they were interned in a camp in Tabora. Mehala (first daughter) was born there in 1916 and her brother Peter 2 years later.
Ted wrote they were well looked after but the marriage broke down and after the war Ted looked after the two children himself.

Mehala remembered the time fondly, especially living in a house with a dirt floor in which one could make mud pies. However misfortune struck again and Ted was killed in a hunting accident in 1922. The two children were sent home by boat in the care of a nanny to be brought up by their grandparents. 
Edmund Hugh Whalley Wickham
 
60 Lived in Tanganika ( German East Africa at the time) with his wife as coffee planters. When the first world war started they were interned in a camp in Tabora. Mehala (first daughter) was born there in 1916 and her brother Peter 2 years later.
Ted wrote they were well looked after but the marriage broke down and after the war Ted looked after the two children himself.

Mehala remembered the time fondly, especially living in a house with a dirt floor in which one could make mud pies. However misfortune struck again and Ted was killed in a hunting accident in 1922. The two children were sent home by boat in the care of a nanny to be brought up by their grandparents. 
Edmund Hugh Whalley Wickham
 
61 Notes by Sally Copp, Evelyn Mary Brancker's granddaughter

Ted Wickham (TW) returned from Brazil on 24-1-1914, landing at Fishguard from the S.S. Hildebrand, whose passenger list showed his occupation as ?planter?
Evelyn Mary Brancker married Ted Wickham in April 1914 in Axbridge Somerset.
Both of their fathers were Vicars in Somerset. Events in their lives must be seen against this background about 100 years ago.
Our family had absolutely no knowledge of EMB?s first marriage to Ted Wickham. Joan Baldock was the only person that she confided in, hence a little knowledge after her death.
The following I gathered from some news paper cuttings of articles that she had written for the Sunday News in 1955. Probably a Kenya paper?
EMB/W and her new husband Ted went to Tanganyika, now Tanzania, in May/ June 1914, when it was German Territory.
She told Joan B. that Governor Schnee in Dar es Salaam, had warned them to go to Zanzibar or be interned, because war was coming.
Ted had a job on a coffee/sisal farm outside Dar-es-Salaam at a place called Soga. Life there was better health wise and away from the politics in Dar. They were not well received by the Germans at Soga being English. They had good neighbours, a Polish Count and Countess who managed to salvage a few of their worldly goods when they were interned. I don?t know how long they were there before they were interned at Tabora for the first time.




WW1 started on 4-8-1914.
By this time her marriage was not going too well as told to JB. No doubt internment put extra pressure on a troubled marriage.
Life in internment camps was tough. They seemed to have been put in trains moved a bit, dumped at a station and made to walk to the next place. This was all along the central railway line from Dar to Tabora. It was extremely hot and they had either bad food or little food. Water was not always healthy. At a place called Bugiri they had to sieve the water through cloth a few times to get rid of the worst of the ?wrigglers?.
Luckily they weren?t in Bugiri for long when shooting started, so they were told to ?be ready to move in half an hour?. They had had no food and were marched up a dry river bed in the dark with injuries to legs and ankles, ?like miserable sheep? to the next station called Kikombo.
They were mainly locked up in railway ?go-downs? which were warehouses frequently made of corrugated metal. One can only imagine the heat in those ?ovens?.
At Kikombo they were locked up for 36 hours in an overcrowded ?go-down? that was very hot, then loaded up on to a train ?like cattle going to slaughter?. She does not remember the journey too well as they were semi-conscious from heat exhaustion and taken back to Tabora for the 2nd time.
Whilst in prison at Tabora (I think) she gave birth to a little girl called Mehala (Mehala Mary W Wickham) on 3-6-1916. Life for new mothers and babies was hard as the Germans made little effort to clothe, feed or help.
Tabora was a huge camp with lots of other nationalities including Polish and a lot of Africans. In Tabora town there were Italian prisoners on parole. They proved very kind and good at bartering odd possessions for sugar and cigarettes and passing them through windows to the prisoners. The internees also discovered via the Italians that the Germans had been stealing all their Red Cross parcels and eating the food. She also met up with some old friends, no names but, thankfully at this point they were no longer under the care of a rather nasty German called Dorendorf

In the early hours of 14th September 1916 a rather hysterical scared person rushed into her room which was near the gate, shouted at her to take the keys and release the prisoners. During the night there had been quite a lot of shooting going on but the prisoners didn?t know what was going on. EMB took the keys and went back to bed until 6am as it was pointless opening the doors at 4am.


It turned out to be the British and Belgian (Congo) lot and they had no idea that there were any prisoners there. The Germans had disappeared into the night but were gradually rounded up and put under lock and key where the prisoners had been liberated from. Freedom at last.
EMB/W had a poisoned foot and a young baby so she was given a lift to Mwanza on Lake Victoria. The others had to walk. From there it was a fairly short time and she was in Nairobi and met up with the others.

After all that things suddenly are a lot vaguer ? no more newspaper cuttings
I think she was in Kenya for a while but have no idea for how long.
She and Ted had a second child called Peter, born in Nairobi on 26-3-1918.
Things went downhill and at some point she divorced Ted Wickham. A terrible disgrace for EMB/ W as she left him.
This is now, how we in Tanganyika came to understand a sad situation. We understood EMB brought the children back to the UK because the situation in Tanganyika was tough and she needed help with the welfare of Mehala and Peter. Her ex in-laws told her if she left them there she need not bother to go back for them. Her own father was dead by then.
We had no idea what had become of TW after internment, although JB told of a mutual acquaintance having seen him in Palestine in 1917 and the Forces War Records show him having served as a Temporary Lieutenant in the Kings African Rifles (KAR).
However we do know that TW was killed by an elephant in Nyeri on 19-9-1926. Felicity found the announcement in ?The Official Gazette of the Colony & Protectorate of Kenya?
Mehala?s family understood from her that EMB had ?abandoned? the two children and they lived with their father until he sent them back to the UK with a nanny.
However, Felicity?s research shows them to be on a ship?s passenger list, Mehala aged 9 and Peter aged 7. They were travelling with Reginald Trelawney Wickham and his wife Olive. He had been a civil servant in Uganda. There is also an Edith Wickham who was Ted?s half sister and she would appear to have been living with Ted to help with Mehala and Peter?
They arrived into the UK on 16-8-1925 with an immigration stamp on the passenger list.
They would therefore have been in the UK when their father Ted was killed.
Felicity also found that prior to 1927 children went to fathers automatically in the event of divorce.

 
Edmund Hugh Whalley Wickham
 
62 North Hill House, Frome James Anthony Wickham
 
63 At least one living individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Peter Reginald Whalley Wickham
 
64 of Sherborne, Banker. Richard Wickham
 
65 of Sherborne, Banker. Richard Wickham
 
66 "Aunt" Stella went to St Hughes, Oxford, where she studied history and got a blue for hockey and then became a teacher.
Mehala remembers that she and Dorothy [Dorothy Ette?] were eventually pupils at St Mary and St Anne's Abbots Bromley. Mehala recalled Aunt Stella acknowledged her aunt-ship of her, but not Dorothy (correctly but much to their amusement) 
Stella Jean Agnes Wickham, m.a.
 
67 Copied from http://www.rooksbridge.org.uk/RootsMagicStuff/b196.htm#P3568


Stella Jean Agnes WICKHAM m.a.117 was born about September 1902 in Yeovil SOM.117 In 1936?1950 she was a history teacher in Cheltenham ladies college.

117 This little anecdote possibly from a pupil, gives an insight into college life in the early 1900's.
In Downside I thought I had been sent, at 10 years old, to a lunatic asylum because while we had our temperatures taken every morning we had to keep our toes off the fireside mat in the dormitory while Matron gave us 3 mouthfuls of pink gargle. Betty and I both have memories of walking from House to College in a silent crocodile, as a house punishment, because someone had scraped their chair after Grace at breakfast and no-one would own up. We still laugh when we remember Miss Wickham falling flat on her face with a pile of exercise books spilling across the floor and raising her head just enough to say
"When I don't laugh it's not funny."
After 1950 continued teaching in Surrey. (Bryan Cooper) Stella Wickham was Godmother to John STRONG (Bryan Cooper) Parents: Rev. Archdale Palmer "Archie" WICKHAM m.a. and Harriet Elizabeth Amy STRONG. 
Stella Jean Agnes Wickham, m.a.
 

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